Posts 09/14/2011

  • Try to develop steady work habits, maybe a more modest quota, but keep to it. Don’t be thin-skinned or easily discouraged because it’s an odds-long proposition; all of the arts are. Many are called, few are chosen, but it might be you.

    JOHN UPDIKE

    tags: habits Writing

  • So if you feel like you’re falling behind, you’re not imagining things—and you’ve got plenty of company. The fading fortunes of the middle class are probably the top factor fueling vast dissatisfaction with government and a pervasive sense of national decline. But this gloomy trend isn’t irreversible, and it’s worth noting that real income levels in 1983–at the tail end of another rough downturn—were at the same levels as they were in 1969, 14 years earlier. What came next were the Reagan-era tax reforms and two decades of steady improvement in household income.

    tags: usnews.com Middle-Class squeeze

    • ou might have three or four careers over the course of your working life, as you respond to rapid changes in the workplace and the global economy.
    • But there’s ample evidence that one key determinant of success is how well you respond to tough challenges. Determination and resilience can even be more valuable than a high IQ or a fancy degree.
    • His most important lessons came from failing and starting over. Most people aren’t as brilliant as Jobs, but they can still benefit from the vital learning that hardship often produces.
    • More work, more stress, less money, less free time, less stuff, and falling satisfaction. But a lower standard of living doesn’t need to be disastrous,

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Posts 09/13/2011

  • Drain De-Clogger Recipe:
    1/2 cup baking soda
    1 cup vinegar
    1 gallon boiling water
    Carefully siphon all the baking soda down the drain. Pour in 1/2 of the vinegar, covering the hole so the fizz is forced down, not up (omit this for toilets, please!). Add the second half of the vinegar, following the same procedure. Allow to sit for 15 minutes or so, and then flush with an entire gallon of boiling water.

    tags: household drain lifehacks

  • 1. The Tap Trick
    Within the first flush or two, right when the trouble starts is the best time to take advantage of the tap trick. What you do is forcefully tap on the backside of the bowl with your shoes (or bare feet). Surprisingly, about 70 percent of the time with a minor clog this will dislodge the trouble area and leave you home free.

    tags: methods plumber toilet crack

  • The simplest toilet unclogging method involves only dishwashing liquid and a bucket of hot water. Here’s how to do it.
    Into the drained toilet bowl tip two cups of dishwashing liquid.
    Allow the detergent to sit for five minutes.
    Fill a bucket with very hot water.
    Pour the hot water into the toilet from about waist height – you want a bit of force behind the water so that it drives the dishwashing liquid down into the clogging material.
    Leave for a quarter of an hour.
    This method usually works quite quickly if it’s going to work at all. If rapid draining and return to normalcy does not occur after an hour, leave to toilet to slow drain until the water level is again manageable and try either of the two following methods.

    tags: toilet way clear how to

  • astery requires focused practice over days or weeks. After only four practice sessions students reach a halfway point to mastery. It takes more than 24 more practice sessions before students reach 80 percent mastery. And this practice must occur over a span of days or weeks, and cannot be rushed (Anderson, 1995; Newell & Rosenbloom, 1981).

    tags: motivation teaching

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Posts 09/12/2011

  • 8. Play with your child Parents playing with children helps build their self-confidence because it shows them their parents enjoy being with them. Children learn through play and one of the many things they can learn is confidence. Play is a great time to role-play and praise your child. Playing with your child and allowing them to dictate the play gives them a feeling of importance and accomplishment. My girls love to play dolls or have a tea party with mommy and my son likes to pretend to go camping and play board games.

    tags: child confidence building

  • tags: proper guide fit

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Posts 09/09/2011

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Posts 09/06/2011

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Posts 09/01/2011

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Posts 08/31/2011

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Posts 08/30/2011

  • Not sure if your child has a concussion? Look for signs of disorientation, dilated pupils, stumbling, wooziness, and memory loss. “If you have to evaluate, chances are there is a legitimate concern,” says Siegel. Always err on the side of caution to avoid risking a more serious and permanent injury. Have the player sit out and seek the opinion of a health care professional immediately for an evaluation. “It generally takes two full weeks or more before a concussion fully heals,” says Siegel. “Head injuries are very serious and can cause severe damage to a child’s brain. It is much better to sit out a day or a few weeks than risk a serious and possibly permanent brain injury.”

    tags: athlete concussion

  • tags: elite select youth sports teams kids

    • This is the age of the youth-sports industrial complex, where men make a living putting on tournaments for 7-year-olds, and parents subject their children to tryouts and pay good money for the right to enter into it.
    • There are buzzwords in this business, sure to coax the gullible parent. The big three terms are “elite,” “select,” and “travel ball.” Oh, the power of those words. Waving the prospect of “travel ball” under the nose of the ambitious father of a talented 9-year-old is like wafting a steak under the nose of a sleeping dog. After all, the more you travel and the farther you go to play a sport, the better you must be at that sport, right?
    • These are 9- and 10-year-olds, which raises a question: What the hell are we doing?
    • We’re creating a class of kids who are being labeled with terms such as “elite” and “competitive” and “best of the best.” They’re being worshipped by their parents and coaches, who keep statistics to post online and send photographs to the local paper. It’s organized insanity.
  • tags: chicagotribune.com prep athletics concussions cdc

    • A report last year by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that from 1997 to 2007, the number of emergency room visits for sports-related concussions had doubled for children ages 8 to 13 and more than tripled for high school athletes. And it’s not just football, but soccer and even cheerleading.
  • Dr. Jim Taylor, a psychology professor at the University of
    San Francisco, put it best when he wrote in the Huffington Post about parents and their roles in developing or supporting a child’s athletic prowess.

    “If your objective is to turn them into champions, the odds are that you’re wasting your money and time and your children’s happiness. Sports are metaphorically littered with the scarred psyches of children whose parents tried and failed to do what Earl Woods and Richard Williams succeeded at doing. Your goals as parents are for your children to have fun, learn life skills to succeed later in life, value health and fitness, and develop a love of sports. If by some freak chance you give them world-class athletic genes, they love the sport enough to work incredibly hard, and they get the right kind of support from you, and they become professional or Olympic athletes, then
    that’s just icing on the cake.”

    tags: football youth coaching tips sports kids

    • Dr. Jim Taylor, a psychology professor at the University of
      San Francisco, put it best when he wrote in the Huffington Post about parents and their roles in developing or supporting a child’s athletic prowess.

       

      “If your objective is to turn them into champions, the odds are that you’re wasting your money and time and your children’s happiness. Sports are metaphorically littered with the scarred psyches of children whose parents tried and failed to do what Earl Woods and Richard Williams succeeded at doing. Your goals as parents are for your children to have fun, learn life skills to succeed later in life, value health and fitness, and develop a love of sports. If by some freak chance you give them world-class athletic genes, they love the sport enough to work incredibly hard, and they get the right kind of support from you, and they become professional or Olympic athletes, then
      that’s just icing on the cake.”

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Posts 08/29/2011

    • At first the skeptics didn’t believe that iTunes could become much of a business, since Apple made only about a dime in profits from every 99-cent song it sold. But iTunes enabled Apple to make money endlessly over time. It was all about enabling “micropayments,” which the gurus had predicted and touted back in the early ’90s, when Al Gore was getting attention with his vision of the “information superhighway.” It
  • Despite its negative connotation, Daniel Coyle, author of The Talent Code, suggests on his blog that quitting is a positive. He says that quitting requires recognition and creativity: one recognizes that the current path isn’t working and looks around to find something better to do. I realized piano was not my passion, so I quit and spent more time playing sports.

    tags: coaching youth football quitting

    • Despite its negative connotation, Daniel Coyle, author of The Talent Code, suggests on his blog that quitting is a positive. He says that quitting requires recognition and creativity: one recognizes that the current path isn’t working and looks around to find something better to do. I realized piano was not my passion, so I quit and spent more time playing sports.
    • Obsessives are rare, especially at young ages. Before one becomes obsessive about improvement and mastering skills, and shows the willingness to engage in more deliberate practice, the player has to develop the passion for the sport. When young athletes dabble, they check out a sport to see if they have that interest to persist and try to become good. If not, they move on to a new activity: Coyle’s recognition and creativity.
    • Which Traits Predict Success?” in Wired. Specifically, he cites a paper titled “Deliberate Practice Spells Success: Why Grittier Competitors Triumph at the National Spelling Bee” published in March 2011 in the journal of Social Psychological and Personality Science by University of Pennsylvania psychologist Angela Duckworth. The paper argues for the importance of grit, which is the quality that allows you to show up over and over again.
    • Grittiness, however, is the opposite of quitting and is much more like the “endless stubbornness.”
    • The Obsessives ultimately become the experts.
    • Should we encourage the dabbling and quitting until one finds something about which he is passionate and willing to expend the effort required of deliberate practice and grittiness?
  • tags: rule blocking vocabulary youth football coaching tips plays offense

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Posts 08/26/2011

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